Psalms Proofs

Jewish Apologetics >> Ketuvim Proofs >> Psalms Proofs

Jesus was God’s son (Psalm 2:7; Matthew 3:17).

This Psalm is parallel to Psalm 89. In Psalm 89 – beginning in verse 27 – it shows that David will call God “my Father” and David is referred to as a firstborn of God (Psalm 89:27-30).

Jesus cried out on the cross (Psalm 22:2; Matthew 27:46; Mark 15:34).

This Psalm is about David. David describes his own pain, anguish, and longing during those times when he was a fugitive from his enemies and he is grieved that God is not always listening to him. David asks why God is “far from my salvation” but Jesus never expected to be saved so why would this verse refer to Jesus? Prophetically, this entire verse is regarding Israel’s plight during its long exile and its plea for a speedy deliverance.

How can this “prophecy” be fulfilled if there is no agreement that Jesus even made this statement (Matthew 27:46, 50; Mark 15:34, 37; Luke 23:46; John 19:30)?

Jesus was mocked (Psalm 22:7-8; Matthew 27:41-44; Mark 15:29-32; Luke 23:35-36,39).

This Psalm is about David. David describes his own pain, anguish, and longing during those times when he was a fugitive from his enemies and he is grieved that God is not always listening to him. David asks why God is “far from my salvation” but Jesus never expected to be saved so why would this verse refer to Jesus? Prophetically, this entire verse is regarding Israel’s plight during its long exile and its plea for a speedy deliverance.

Jesus was crucified (Psalm 22:17; Matthew 27:35; Mark 15:25; Luke 23:33; John 19:17-18).

This Psalm is about David. David describes his own pain, anguish, and longing during those times when he was a fugitive from his enemies and he is grieved that God is not always listening to him. David asks why God is “far from my salvation” but Jesus never expected to be saved so why would this verse refer to Jesus? Prophetically, this entire verse is regarding Israel’s plight during its long exile and its plea for a speedy deliverance.

The Christian scriptures use a non-existent Hebrew word. Missionaries have made up a new Hebrew word (one that never has existed). They say that korai means pierced which leads them to mistranslate the passage. The word ka’ari (כָּאֲרִי) means like a lion or as a lion. This same word is used (and correctly translated in the Christian scriptures) in:

Numbers 23:24: Look, a people rises like a lioness, And lifts itself up like a lion (כַּאֲרִי); It shall not lie down until it devours the prey, And drinks the blood of the slain.”

Numbers 24:9: ‘He bows down, he lies down as a lion; And as a lion (כַּאֲרִי), who shall rouse him?’ “Blessed [is] he who blesses you, And cursed [is] he who curses you.” (NKJV)

Isaiah 38:13: I have considered until morning– Like a lion (כַּאֲרִי), So He breaks all my bones; From day until night You make an end of me. (NKJV)

Ezekiel 22:25: The conspiracy of her prophets in her midst is like a roaring lion (כַּאֲרִי) tearing the prey; they have devoured people; they have taken treasure and precious things; they have made many widows in her midst. (NKJV)

Jesus’ garments were taken and distributed by lots (Psalm 22:19; Matthew 27:35; Mark 15:24; Luke 23:34; John 19:23-24).

This Psalm is about David. David describes his own pain, anguish, and longing during those times when he was a fugitive from his enemies and he is grieved that God is not always listening to him. David asks why God is “far from my salvation” but Jesus never expected to be saved so why would this verse refer to Jesus? Prophetically, this entire verse is regarding Israel’s plight during its long exile and its plea for a speedy deliverance.

The previous verse (Psalms 22:18: I tell about all my bones. They look and gloat over me.) shows that the subject of this Psalm is so skinny that his bones could be counted. David is talking about himself as a metaphorical reference to the desire of his enemies to take away his throne and claim it as their own.

Jesus did not have his bones broken on the cross (Psalm 34:21; John 19:32-33).

The preceding verse shows that the person referred to in verse 21 is a generic righteous person – not a specific person (Psalm 34:20).

Jesus had false witnesses against him (Psalm 35:11; Mark 14:57).

This verse refers to David. David is speaking about false accusations that were hurled at him by his enemies. If you read the entire chapter, it is evident that this is referring to David’s friends who have turned into enemies.

Jesus’ family, disciples, and friends stood far away (Psalm 38:12; Matthew 27:55; Mark 15:40; Luke 23:49).

There is no consensus as to where Jesus’ acquaintances stood. Matthew, Mark, and Luke all state that Jesus’ acquaintances stood far off yet this is not what John says (John 19:25).

This verse refers to David. In this verse David is referring to those who act like his friends but stand aloof from him when he is afflicted. He is also referring to people who have shown to be close to him who stand at a distance. David is making the statement that suffering is chastisement for sin and part of that suffering is having close ones stand at a distance.

If this verse refers to Jesus then the entire chapter must refer to him. Christianity claims that Jesus was sinless so he cannot be the object of this verse or chapter (Psalm 38:5,19).

Jesus was betrayed by a friend (Psalm 41:10; Matthew 26:21-23; Mark 14:18-20; Luke 22:21-22; John 13:21,26).

This verse – and chapter – refers to David. If one reads the entire Psalm, it is very clear that David is speaking about a close associate who was trying to trip up David. Verse 12 shows that David is successful and the plot is unsuccessful. This is the opposite of the Judas plot which was successful (Psalm 41:12).

If this verse refers to Jesus then the entire chapter must refer to him. Christianity claims that Jesus was sinless so he cannot be the object of this verse or chapter (Psalm 41:5).

Jesus was offered gall and vinegar during his crucifixion (Psalm 69:22; Matthew 27:34; Mark 15:23).

There is no consensus as to what Jesus drank during the crucifixion. There is not one single verse that describes Jesus being offered gall mixed with vinegar. The closest in sour wine mixed with gall in Matthew 27.

*Matthew records sour wine mingled with gall and sour wine (Matthew 27:34-35, 46-48)

*Mark records wine mingled with myrrh and sour wine (Mark 15:23-24, 34-36)

*Luke records sour wine (Luke 23:36)

*John records sour wine (John 19:29-30)

This verse is about David. David describes his own pain, anguish, and longing during those times when he was a fugitive from his enemies. He is metaphorically stating that his enemies were unusually cruel to him – “putting salt in his wounds”. Prophetically, this entire verse is regarding Israel’s plight during its long exile and its plea for a speedy deliverance.

If this verse refers to Jesus then the entire chapter must refer to him. Christianity claims that Jesus was sinless so he cannot be the object of this verse or chapter (Psalm 69:6).

Jesus sat at God’s right side (Psalm 110:1; Matthew 22:44; Mark 12:36, 16:19; Luke 20:42-43; Acts 2:34-35; Hebrews 1:13).

This verse is about David. In the Hebrew text the initial verse says “Of David a psalm” indicating that this psalm was written about David.

This scripture has been misinterpreted based upon a mistranslated scripture. The original Hebrew says: The word of the Lord to my master – while the Christian translation says: The Lord says to my Lord.

The Christian translation is also mistranslated because the original Hebrew says “Wait for My right hand” and not “Sit at My right hand.”

The remainder of the chapter speaks of David’s rule and what God has done for him in defeating his enemies. None of this ever happened to Jesus.

Jesus was the stone that was rejected by his people and he became the cornerstone for a new religion (Psalm 118:22; Matthew 21:42; I Peter 2:7).

This verse is about David. This verse is metaphorically about David being rejected by his father and brothers when Samuel came to Jesse’s home to anoint one of his sons as the next king of Israel.

Prophetically, this verse can refer to the Children of Israel who were despised and rejected by the Nations but those same Nations will come to realize that the Children of Israel is the cornerstone (Genesis 49:24).

There is a call for thanksgiving and prayer in the remaining part of the chapter (Psalm 118: 24-29) but there is no call for thanksgiving and prayer after the rejection of Jesus.