Isaiah Proofs

Jewish Apologetics >> Nevi’im Proofs >> Isaiah Proofs

People were deaf to Jesus’ words (Isaiah 6:9-12; Matthew 13:13-15; Acts 28:23-29).

God is speaking specifically to Isaiah. Verse 9 plainly shows that God is commanding Isaiah to go to a specific people. This is obviously not a prophecy for a future messiah and a future people.

These verses are talking about how the people who are in Isaiah’s time have seen miracles from God yet the people did not strive to know God. The people intend to not listen to the words of the prophets due to fear. However, there will be a time that they will repent and return to God. Unfortunately, the repentance will not come until the Land has expelled them and they languish in exile.

Jesus was born of a virgin (Isaiah 7:14; Matthew 1:18-23; Luke 1:35).

The word used is translated as young maiden (or young woman) and not virgin. Almah means a young woman of marriageable age and has nothing to do with being a virgin or not.

Jewish Translation – Psalm 68:26: Singers went first, minstrels afterwards, in the midst of maidens (הָעַלְמָה) playing timbrels.

Christian Translation – Psalm 68:26: The singers went before, the players on instruments [followed] after; Among [them were] the maidens (הָעַלְמָה) playing timbrels.

The Hebrew term for virgin is betulah.

Jewish Translation – Isaiah 23:4: Be ashamed, for the sea said, the stronghold of the sea, saying, “I have not travailed, nor have I borne, neither have I reared young men nor have I raised virgins (בְתוּלוֹת).”

Christian Translation – Isaiah 23:4: Be ashamed, O Sidon; For the sea has spoken, The strength of the sea, saying, “I do not labor, nor bring forth children; Neither do I rear young men, [Nor] bring up virgins (בְתוּלוֹת).”

The Greek word parthenos (παρθένος) used in Matthew 1:23 can mean virgin but it can also mean maiden. The Greek word is ambiguous but the Hebrew term is absolute.

Some Christian Old Testaments translate the word in question as “young maiden.”

Isaiah 7:14: Well then, the Lord himself will give you a sign; a young woman who is pregnant will have a son and will name him ‘Immanual’. (Good News Bible, Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1976)

*Footnote: The Hebrew word here translated “young woman” is not the particular term for “virgin,” but refers to any young woman of marriageable age. The use of “virgin” in Matthew 1:23 reflects a Greek translation of the Old Testament made some 500 years after Isaiah.

Isaiah 7:14: The Lord will give you a sign in any case: It is this: the young woman is with child and will give birth to a son whom she will call Immanuel. (The New Jerusalem Bible Reader’s Edition, Doubleday, 1990)

*Footnote: Perhaps Ahaz’s wife, about to give birth to Hezekiah, but Isaiah sees it as symbolic of the fulfillment of royal messianic prophecies. For ‘young woman’ Greek read ‘virgin’, interpreted by Matthew of Mary.

Isaiah 7:14: Therefore Adonai himself will give you people a sign: the young woman will become pregnant, bear a son and name him ‘Immanu El [God is with us].’ (The Complete Jewish Bible, Jewish New Testament Publications, 1998)

*Footnote: The Hebrew word ‘almah in Isaiah 7:14 means “a young woman,” and in the context of the Tanakh always “a young woman of unsullied reputation,” which is why the Jewish translators of the Septuagint, the Greek version of the Tanakh prepared 200 years before Yeshua’s birth, rendered this word into Greek as parthenos, “virgin”; this is the word used in Mattituahu 1:23.

The Christian Scriptures mistranslates this verse to make it appear as if it were a future prophecy (with regards to the pregnancy). We can plainly see that she was pregnant at the time of this prophecy.

Jewish Translation – Therefore, the Lord, of His own, shall give you a sign; behold, the young woman is with child, and she shall bear a son, and she shall call his name Immanuel.

Christian Translation – Therefore the Lord Himself will give you a sign: Behold, the virgin shall conceive and bear a Son, and shall call His name Immanuel.

The prophecy is not about the virginity or non-virginity of the woman nor is the prophecy about the birth. In reality, the prophecy is what will happen during the child’s life (Isaiah 7:14-16). The child spoken of in Isaiah is the son of Isaiah. This prophecy was already fulfilled (II Kings 15:30; 16:9). The child was already born and spoken of in the very next chapter (Isaiah 8:4).

Jesus was not named Immanuel. The name Immanuel means God is with us. There is no problem with such a name within the Jewish context. There are many names with similar meanings such as Michah which means Who is Like God. Jesus’ name most likely was Yehoshua – Joshua. This name means the Lord is salvation. This is not the same as God is with us.

Jesus was a stone of stumbling and a rock of offense (Isaiah 8:14-15; I Peter 2:8).

This is a prophecy about Shebna and Pekah who plotted to overthrow the kingdom of the House of David. The stone and the rock are references to stumbling. Shebna’s and Pekah’s stumbling will cause them to be destroyed instead of Jerusalem. Upon the stone and rock, these two and their companions shall fall into the hands of their enemies. Pekah was assassinated by Hoshea. The ten tribes fell into the hands of Sennacherib. Shebna went out of Jerusalem when Sennacherib abandoned it to march on the king of Cush.

Jesus was a light (Isaiah 8:23-9:1; Matthew 4:12-17).

This is referring to God dealing mildly by exiling Zebulun and Naphtali. The verse in chapter nine that refers to a “light” is speaking about the inhabitants of Jerusalem, who were darkened by their concern of falling into the hands of Sennacherib. When Sennacherib was defeated light shone upon the inhabitants of Jerusalem.

This is an example of a very convoluted and complete extraction of verses out of context to try and force a messianic prophecy into verses that have nothing to do with the true Messiah.

Jesus was the literal son of God with power (Isaiah 9:5; Luke 1:32; John 1:14; I Timothy 3:16; Romans 1:3-4).

This prophecy was about Hezekiah.

Jewish Translation: For a child has been born to us, a son given to us, and the authority is upon his shoulder, and the wondrous adviser, the mighty God, the everlasting Father, called his name, “the prince of peace.”

Christian Translations:

For unto us a Child is born, Unto us a Son is given; And the government will be upon His shoulder. And His name will be called Wonderful, Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. (NKJV)

For to us a child is born, to us a son is given, and the government will be on his shoulders. And he will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. (NIV)

For a son has been born for us, a son has been given to us, and dominion has been laid on his shoulders; and this is the name he has been given, ‘Wonder-Counsellor, Mighty-God, Eternal-Father, Prince of Peace’ (The New Jerusalem Bible)

We see from the correct (Jewish) translation of the verse in Isaiah that this verse refers to a person already born at the time of the prophecy – not some to be born hundreds of years later. We also see that the authority was already placed upon his shoulder – not authority of a future time. In addition, his name was already given to him – this is not the name of a future person.

This prophecy was about Hezekiah – Ahaz’s son – who would become king. Hezekiah’s role was to bring Judah back from their wickedness and lead the righteous remnant. This verse speaks of the wonders that God did for Hezekiah by sparing the kingdom from Sennacherib and his army during the siege of Jerusalem.

Jesus was called the wonderful one, counselor, mighty God, everlasting Father, and prince of peace (Isaiah 9:5; Matthew 1:23, 11:20, 13:54; Luke 4:22; John 8:58, 16:33).

The titles belong to both God and Hezekiah. The titles “the wondrous adviser, the mighty God, the everlasting Father” are all related to God. The title “the prince of peace” is the only one that refers to the child himself.

Wondrous refers to the wonder of the sun going backwards on God’s command when Hezekiah was miraculously cured from his illness (Isaiah 38:8). Adviser refers to the time when Hezekiah and his staff came up with a plan when Sennacherib sieged Jerusalem (II Chronicles 32:3). Mighty God – which can also be translated as Mighty Hero – refers to the destruction of Sennacherib’s army (II Chronicles 32:21). Everlasting Father alludes to the fact that due to Hezekiah’s righteousness, the Davidic dynasty was prolonged and has been preserved for the eternal future (II Chronicles 32:22).

Prince of Peace refers to the prolonged peace that occurred during the reign of Hezekiah (II Chronicles 30:25).

It is obvious that Jesus is not a “prince of peace” in Matthew 10:34.

Jesus was an heir to David’s eternal throne (Isaiah 9:6; Matthew 1:1,6).

Jesus is not eligible for David’s throne. He is not a direct, biological descendent of David (Matthew 1:18).

Jesus – in the genealogy of Matthew – is a descendent of Jeconiah (Matthew 1:12). However in Jeremiah 22:30 we see that the descendants of Jeconiah are cut off from ever sitting on the throne of David. Therefore, Jesus is not eligible for David’s throne. [Comparative Genealogy]

This prophecy was about Hezekiah. Hezekiah’s role was to bring Judah back from their wickedness and lead the righteous remnant. This verse speaks of the wonders that God did for Hezekiah by sparing the kingdom from Sennacherib and his army during the siege of Jerusalem.

Jesus established an everlasting kingdom (Isaiah 9:6; Luke 1:32-33).

Jesus is not eligible for David’s throne. He is not a direct, biological descendent of David (Matthew 1:18).

Jesus – in the genealogy of Matthew – is a descendent of Jeconiah (Matthew 1:12). However in Jeremiah 22:30 we see that the descendants of Jeconiah are cut off from ever sitting on the throne of David. Therefore, Jesus is not eligible for David’s throne.

Jesus never established an eternal kingdom. Jesus was never a king. This is not a prophecy that was ever fulfilled by him.

This prophecy was about Hezekiah. Hezekiah’s role was to bring Judah back from their wickedness and lead the righteous remnant. This verse speaks of the wonders that God did for Hezekiah by sparing the kingdom from Sennacherib and his army during the siege of Jerusalem.

Jesus had a character of justice (Isaiah 9:6; John 5:30).

Righteousness comes from the Father. Jesus is saying that his judgment is righteous because it comes from the Father. He is not claiming a character of justice because he is a god.

Jesus was a Nazarene (Isaiah 11:1; Matthew 2:23; Luke 2:23,32).

The verse from Matthew supposedly refers to the prophecy from Judges 13:5. The word used in Judges is Nazirite – someone who has taken the Nazirite vows as described in Number 6:1-21. Jesus was not a Nazirite.

The verse in Matthew speaks of the prophets saying “He shall be called a Nazarene.” The problem is that there is no such prophecy. The city of Nazareth is never mentioned in the Tanakh.

Jesus was the anointed One by the Holy Spirit (Isaiah 11:2; Matthew 3:16-17).

The spirit of God will rest upon the shoot of Jesse referred to in verse one. This shoot of Jesse is the coming Messiah. The coming Messiah will be a physical, direct descendant of David through Solomon. Jesus is not eligible for David’s throne. He is not a direct, biological descendent of David (Matthew 1:18).

Jesus is listed as a “descendant” of David through both Nathan and Solomon (Matthew 1:6; Luke 3:31). Jesus is ineligible because he is a supposed descendant of Jeconiah (Matthew 1:12). The descendants of Jeconiah are cut off from ever sitting on the throne of David. Therefore, Jesus is not eligible for David’s throne (Jeremiah 22:30).

Jesus showed the character of truth (Isaiah 11:4; John 14:6).

There are multiple ways to “salvation” and none of them include a human sacrifice (Isaiah 12:2; Psalm 68:20-21; Ezekiel 33:14-16; Hosea 14:3).

Jesus had gentiles seeking him (Isaiah 11:10; John 12:18-21).

At the End of Days, the Nations of the world will come to seek the true Messiah. When the true Messiah arrives, all Nations will seek him and come to know God through him. The Nations did not seek out Jesus. There is still idolatry in the world and Christianity continues to seek to spread their message to the world.

Jesus was called Yeshua (Isaiah 12:2; Matthew 1:21).

This “prophecy” contradicts another “prophecy” claimed by Christianity (Isaiah 7:14). Is the prophecy that he will be called Immanuel or is the prophecy that he will be called “Jesus”? The name Immanuel means God with us but “Jesus” means God is salvation. Which prophecy is the correct one?

In the original Greek, Jesus would be Ἰησοῦς (ē-ā-sü’s) which is a form of יְהוֹשֻׁעַ (Joshua) which means God is salvation. The first mention of Joshua was in the Torah during the Exodus. Does this mean that since יְהוֹשֻׁעַ was first mentioned in the Torah that בִּן-נוּן יְהוֹשֻׁעַ was also a god of salvation?

Yes, names do in fact carry significance in the Tanakh but that does not mean that if the name of God is used in a name that the person is in fact God Himself. Would Christianity also claim that יְשַׁעְיָהוּ – Isaiah whose name also means God is salvation is also God Himself? What about אֲבִישׁוּעַ – Abishua whose name means my father is deliverance? Is Abishua God incarnate? What about מַלְכִּישׁוּעַ – Malchi-shua whose name means my king save? Is Malchi-shua God incarnate?

Jesus was resurrected from the dead (Isaiah 25:8; I Corinthians 15:54).

This supposed prophecy is a misquotation. There is no indication that “death is swallowed up in victory” found in the passage from Isaiah. Look at the verse in Isaiah and you will notice that it also says that the shame of His people will be removed from the entire earth. This has obviously not yet happened.

Jesus had the power of resurrection (Isaiah 26:19; John 11:43-44).

This is not a prophecy about the messiah having control over resurrection. Isaiah is asking that God will allow those who went to their graves for His sake, be raised up again. This is in opposition to Isaiah’s stand in verse 14 where he asks God to not raise those who were slackers in Torah. This is not a prophecy about the messiah having control over resurrection. This is a request that God Himself shall raise the righteous dead.

Jesus was the cornerstone (Isaiah 28:16; Acts 4:11-12).

Jesus did not weed out the wicked as prophesied. According to Rashi, this is indeed a Messianic prophecy. It speaks of a time when the true Messiah arrives to weed out the wicked. Notice however, that the last part of this verse is ignored. I contend that this piece of the prophecy is ignored because it does not fit in with the supposed prophecy of Jesus.

According to Jesus, the supposed cornerstone, the prophecy (weeding out of the wicked) is at hand (Matthew 24:33-34). Yet in the verse from Isaiah, it clearly states that this prophecy will not come soon.

Jesus healed the blind, deaf, lame, and mute (Isaiah 29:18; Matthew 11:5).

This prophecy is about a specific day. This entire passage is Isaiah’s prophecy regarding those who refuse to return to God. God – through Isaiah – is cursing the people and telling them that outsiders will come and defeat the people as punishment for their sins. Look closely at the passage in Isaiah and notice that it says “on that day”. This prophecy is talking about a specific day.

Joy will increase for those who continue to worship God. In the very next verse, the prophecy continues. This is a continuation of the prophecy that says that those who continued to follow God would be increased in joy and they shall continue to praise God. After Jesus’ supposed death, those who continued to follow God had their lives turn increasingly harsh. This does not fit into the prophecy.

Jesus wished to be a shelter (Isaiah 32:2; Matthew 23:37).

The person spoken about in Isaiah is a man but according to Christianity Jesus is God which means this verse is not about Jesus. The man spoken about in this verse is a reference back to verse one. This man in verse two is a king. Jesus never reigned as a king.

This entire prophecy is about Hezekiah and his ability to lead the two tribes from the southern kingdom and the remaining remnant of the ten tribes from the northern kingdom.

Notice that in the verse from Matthew it states “How often I wanted to gather your children together….” This implies that Jesus was never a shield for the people. But, in the verse from Isaiah, it states that the man will in fact be a shelter.

Jesus was preceded by John the Baptizer (Isaiah 40:3; Matthew 3:3).

This is clearly a reference to the return of the exiles back to Jerusalem. The voice is calling out for the return of the exiles back to Jerusalem and the defeat of their enemies (Isaiah 40:10-11).

There is a belief in Judaism that Elijah will be the forerunner of the Moshiach. Christianity claims that John the Baptizer is Elijah. There are a couple problems with this assumption. First, the idea of Elijah being the forerunner of the Messiah was not even known in the first century CE. According to Morris M. Faierstein “contrary to the accepted scholarly consensus, almost no evidence has been preserved which indicates that the concept of Elijah as forerunner of the Messiah was widely known or accepted in the first century C.E.”  —Why Do the Scribes Say That Elijah Must Come First? (Journal of Biblical Literature 100 (1981) 75-86) Second, John the Baptizer denies that he is Elijah (John 1:21).

Jesus was like a compassionate shepherd (Isaiah 40:11; John 10:11).

If we look at this verse within context we see that God is calling to the prophets to console the Children of Israel. This chapter is a future prophecy which tells the Children of Israel that they will ultimately be redeemed. Verse eleven is simply telling the Children of Israel that God cares for them and will watch over them as a good shepherd watches over and cares for his flock.

Even if this were a messianic prophecy, it does not specifically point to Jesus. There were plenty of shepherds – both literal and figurative – in the Tanakh and afterward. Why could this verse not just as easily refer to Rabbi Akiva or Bar-Kochba? Both of whom were shepherds to the Children of Israel and laid down their lives for them?

Jesus was the redeeming servant (Isaiah 42:1-4; Matthew 12:18-21).

This entire prophecy rests upon the meaning of who the servant is in the verse from Isaiah. Christianity claims this servant is Jesus. However, this is incorrect. Israel is the servant spoken of in Isaiah (Psalms 135:4; Isaiah 45:4, 41:8-9).

Verse two of Isaiah states that the servant “shall neither cry nor shall he raise [his voice]” but Jesus did cry and raise his voice (Matthew 27:45-46, 50).

Verse two refers to the fact that in the End Times, the Nations will come to learn from Israel on their own. Israel will not need to proselytize.

Jesus did not sit in judgment and was himself judged (John 18:33-38). The Nations will come to Israel in the End Times who will sit on a seat of justice.

Jesus was weakened and broken (Matthew 27:45-46, 50).

Jesus was delighted in by God (Isaiah 42:1; Matthew 3:17, 17:5).

This entire prophecy rests upon the meaning of who the servant is in the verse from Isaiah. Christianity claims this servant is Jesus. However, this is incorrect. Israel is the servant spoken of in Isaiah (Psalms 135:4; Isaiah 45:4, 41:8-9).

Jesus showed worldwide compassion by spreading his teachings (Isaiah 42:1,6; Matthew 28:19-20).

This entire prophecy rests upon the meaning of who the servant is in the verse from Isaiah. Christianity claims this servant is Jesus. However, this is incorrect. Israel is the servant spoken of in Isaiah (Psalms 135:4; Isaiah 45:4, Isaiah 41:8-9).

Verse six is a direct reference to Isaiah himself. Notice it says that God “formed you”. This cannot refer to Jesus since, according to Christianity Jesus always existed and is not a created being.

Jesus was meek and lowly and did not cry (Isaiah 42:2-3; Matthew 11:28-30).

This entire prophecy rests upon the meaning of who the servant is in the verse from Isaiah. Christianity claims this servant is Jesus. However, this is incorrect. Israel is the servant spoken of in Isaiah (Psalms 135:4; Isaiah 45:4, 41:8-9).

Verse two says nothing about the servant being meek and lowly. In fact, what this verse references is to the End Times when the Nations will come to learn from Israel on their own. Israel will not need to proselytize.

Jesus did cry out and make his voice heard (Matthew 27:45-46, 50, 28:19-20).

Jesus brought hope to the hopeless (Isaiah 42:3; John 4:10).

This entire prophecy rests upon the meaning of who the servant is in the verse from Isaiah. Christianity claims this servant is Jesus. However, this is incorrect. Israel is the servant spoken of in Isaiah (Psalms 135:4; Isaiah 45:4, 41:8-9).

In verse three there is not mention of the servant bringing hope to the hopeless as indicated by the Christian proof text of John.

Jesus did not sit in judgment and was himself judged (John 18:33-38). The Nations will come to Israel in the End Times who will sit on a seat of justice.

Jesus taught and was a light unto the nations (Isaiah 42:4,6; John 12:26; Luke 2:32).

This entire prophecy rests upon the meaning of who the servant is in the verse from Isaiah. Christianity claims this servant is Jesus. However, this is incorrect. Israel is the servant spoken of in Isaiah (Psalms 135:4; Isaiah 45:4, 41:8-9).

Jesus was weakened and broken (Matthew 27:45-46, 50).

Jesus did not sit in judgment and was himself judged (John 18:33-38).

Jesus did not come to teach the gentiles (Matthew 10:5-6, 15:24). Verse four references the End Times when the entire earth will know of God and His Torah which will be taught by the servant Israel.

Jesus was a covenant given by God (Isaiah 42:6; Romans 11:27; Galatians 3:17; Hebrews 8:6,8,10).

This entire prophecy rests upon the meaning of who the servant is in the verse from Isaiah. Christianity claims this servant is Jesus. However, this is incorrect. Israel is the servant spoken of in Isaiah (Psalms 135:4; Isaiah 45:4, 41:8-9).

The redeemer will come to Zion and not from Zion (Romans 11:27). This statement actually begin in the previous verse (Romans 11:26-27). This is in fact a reference to Isaiah 59:20-21. Paul has the verse wrong. Romans says “The Deliverer will come out of Zion” when in fact the verse in Isaiah says “a redeemer shall come to Zion”.

The covenant is not a person (Isaiah 59:21). The actual covenant is spelled out in verse 21 – that is the words of God will always be with Israel.

Paul goes on to say that the Law established at Mount Sinai was given due to transgressions and has now been superseded by Jesus’ teachings (Galatians 3:17). This is patently false. The Law is eternal (Numbers 15:15).

God does not make mistakes. Hebrews 8:7 reads: “For if that first covenant had been faultless, then no place would have been sought for a second.” Does this mean that Christianity thinks that God can make mistakes? This is obviously the case if Christianity believes that the eternal covenant had faults.

When the Messiah comes, all the world will know of God (Hebrews 8:11). Verse 11 is completely skipped over in this proof-text. This part of the prophecy has yet to come true.

This whole exchange is based upon Jeremiah 31:30-33. The universal knowledge of God is part of the referenced prophecy from Jeremiah but this has yet to happen.

Paul changes the actual text.

Hebrews 8:9: not according to the covenant that I made with their fathers in the day when I took them by the hand to lead them out of the land of Egypt; because they did not continue in My covenant, and I disregarded them, says the LORD.

However, let’s look at Jeremiah 31:31: Not like the covenant that I formed with their forefathers on the day I took them by the hand to take them out of the land of Egypt, that they broke My covenant, although I was a lord [or husband unto] over them, says the Lord.

God did NOT disregard the Children of Israel as claimed by Paul.

A covenant is a contractual agreement. The new covenant is in fact the agreement by Israel to obey the Torah. The covenant is the agreement to follow Torah and not the Torah itself (Jeremiah 31:32). It clearly states that the new covenant will be the agreement that Israel will turn back to God and obey Torah.

Jesus was the only savior (Isaiah 43:11; Acts 4:12).

Jesus was not the savior spoken about in this verse. The verse from Isaiah specifically states that it is the Lord – God – who is the only savior. The name used for God that is translated as “Lord” is יהוה. The Savior is referenced in Isaiah 43:1. Jesus is not the Creator. He did not form Israel and he did not redeem Israel. God has clearly stated that He is the only Savior.

Jesus was of the Spirit of God (Isaiah 44:3; John 16:7,13).

Jesus was not the person spoken to in this verse. We see in the very first verse of this chapter who God is speaking to (Isaiah 44:1).

The subject of this verse will have physical descendants. This verse speaks of the seed of Jacob and Israel. It says nothing about a particular individual or the Messiah. We see in verse four that the promise continues. Jesus did not have any physical seed according to Christianity.

Jesus was a judge (Isaiah 45:23; John 5:22; Romans 14:11).

This is not a Messianic prophecy but speaks about Cyrus and the rebuilding of the Jerusalem Temple. In Isaiah we see God declaring that Cyrus will permit the Jews to leave Babylonia and return to Jerusalem. Upon seeing the rebuilding of Jerusalem and the defeat of many nations, the Nations will declare that God is the Creator and He is the only true God. There is no indication that this verse from Isaiah is a messianic prophecy. It speaks about a specific time and place but does not prophesy about a future messianic event.

Notice that the two proof texts actually contradict themselves. In John we see that it is declared that God will not judge but Jesus himself will judge. However, in Romans we see that it is God who will be the judge. This is clearly seen in the next verse (Romans 14:12).

There are no indications that Jesus ever judged anyone.

Jesus was the first and the last (Isaiah 48:12; Revelation 1:8,17).

The subject of the verse in Isaiah is God. The verse from Isaiah is clearly speaking about God Himself. This is revealed in the very next verse (Isaiah 48:13).

Jesus was a teacher (Isaiah 48:17; John 3:2).

The subject of the Isaiah verse is God. The verse from Isaiah is clearly speaking about God Himself. This is revealed in the very next verse (Isaiah 48:18). Jesus did not give the commandments to the people.

Jesus being a teacher is not specific to the Messiah. Even if Jesus was a teacher why would that make him any different from other teachers that had been with the Children of Israel before and after him? Being a teacher is not specific just to the Messiah.

Jesus was called from the womb (Isaiah 49:1; Matthew 1:18).

The servant spoken about is not Jesus. It is very plainly spelled out that verse one is speaking about Israel and not a future Messiah.

In verse five we see that this servant was “formed” – that is, created. According to Christianity, Jesus is a non-created being.

Jesus was a servant from the womb (Isaiah 49:5; Luke 1:31; Philippians 2:7).

The servant spoken about is not Jesus. It is very plainly spelled out that verse one is speaking about Israel and not a future Messiah.

In verse five we see that this servant was “formed” – that is, created. According to Christianity, Jesus is a non-created being.

Jesus was the salvation for Israel (Isaiah 49:6; Luke 2:29-32).

The servant spoken about is not Jesus. It is very plainly spelled out that verse one is speaking about Israel and not a future Messiah.

In verse five we see that this servant was “formed” – that is, created. According to Christianity, Jesus is a non-created being.

This verse from Isaiah states that Jacob and Israel will be ingathered. This has yet to happen.

God’s salvation (Torah) has yet to reach the entirety of the earth.

Jesus was a light to the nations (Isaiah 49:6; Acts 13:47).

The servant spoken about is not Jesus. It is very plainly spelled out that verse one is speaking about Israel and not a future Messiah.

In verse five we see that this servant was “formed” – that is, created. According to Christianity, Jesus is a non-created being.

Notice that in the supposed proof text from Acts, it states “For so the Lord has commanded us…” This verse from Acts is a statement by Paul and Barnabas about themselves and not a verse about Jesus.

Even if this verse was talking about Jesus it would contradict his own statements to his followers that he (and they) are to only go to the “lost sheep of Israel” (Matthew 15:24, 10:5-6).

Jesus was despised by the nations (Isaiah 49:7; John 15:24-25).

The servant spoken about is not Jesus. It is very plainly spelled out that verse one is speaking about Israel and not a future Messiah.

In verse five we see that this servant was “formed” – that is, created. According to Christianity, Jesus is a non-created being. Verse eight further proves that the person spoken of in verse seven is in fact Israel and not a Messianic figure. This is obviously talking about a group of people – that is, Israel.

The heaven was clothed in black at Jesus’ humiliation on the cross (Isaiah 50:3; Luke 23:44-45).

The servant spoken about is not Jesus. It is very plainly spelled out that verse one is speaking about Israel and not a future Messiah.

The servant has sinned and is being called to repent. God is talking about the servant’s iniquities (Isaiah 50:1) yet, according to Christianity, Jesus was sinless. Furthermore, God calls the servant to repent (Isaiah 50:2). Again, how can verse three be a reference to Jesus if Jesus was supposedly sinless?

Jesus was a learned counselor for the weary (Isaiah 50:4; Matthew 11:28-29).

The servant spoken about is not Jesus. It is very plainly spelled out that verse one is speaking about Israel and not a future Messiah.

The servant has sinned and is being called to repent. God is talking about the servant’s iniquities (Isaiah 50:1) yet, according to Christianity, Jesus was sinless. Furthermore, God calls the servant to repent (Isaiah 50:2). Again, how can verse three be a reference to Jesus if Jesus was supposedly sinless?

Jesus was willingly bound to obedience (Isaiah 50:5; Matthew 26:39).

The servant spoken about is not Jesus. It is very plainly spelled out that verse one is speaking about Israel and not a future Messiah. Israel did not rebel against their gentile oppressors and thus, fulfilling this prophecy.

The servant has sinned and is being called to repent. God is talking about the servant’s iniquities (Isaiah 50:1) yet, according to Christianity, Jesus was sinless. Furthermore, God calls the servant to repent (Isaiah 50:2). Again, how can verse three be a reference to Jesus if Jesus was supposedly sinless?

Jesus was spat upon, struck, and scourged (Isaiah 50:6; Matthew 27:26-30).

Isaiah 49:3: And He said to me, “You are My servant, Israel, about whom I will boast.”

It is very plainly spelled out that verse one is speaking about Israel and not a future Messiah.

Israel did not rebel against their gentile oppressors, thus fulfilling this prophecy.

The servant spoken about is not Jesus. It is very plainly spelled out that verse one is speaking about Israel and not a future Messiah. Israel did not rebel against their gentile oppressors and thus, fulfilling this prophecy.

The servant has sinned and is being called to repent. God is talking about the servant’s iniquities (Isaiah 50:1) yet, according to Christianity, Jesus was sinless. Furthermore, God calls the servant to repent (Isaiah 50:2). Again, how can verse three be a reference to Jesus if Jesus was supposedly sinless?

This verse again talks about the same servant – Israel – as is being discussed in verse six. God wonders why none of Israel was ready to repent and bring about the redemption. They were not ready to repent even after witnessing all God’s miracles.

There are multiple problems with the stories of Jesus’ alleged trial and crucifixion.

Who exactly brought Jesus to Pilate? Was it only the Chief Priests or were others also involved? Who did Pilate address – only the Chief Priests or others as well?

According to Matthew Jesus was brought to Pilate by the Chief Priests and the Elders. Pilate addressed only the Chief Priests and Jesus during this exchange (Matthew 27:1-2, 11-14).

According to Mark Jesus was brought to Pilate by the Chief Priests, Elders, and Scribes – in fact by the “whole Sanhedrin”. Pilate addressed only the Chief Priests and Jesus during this exchange (Mark 15:1-5).

According to Luke, Jesus was brought to Pilate by the Chief Priests, Elders, and Scribes – by the “whole assembly”. Pilate addressed not only the Chief priests but also the crowd that had gathered during this exchange (Luke 23:1-6).

Did only Pilate question Jesus or did Herod also question him?

In Luke we discover that Jesus is in fact questioned by both Pilate and Herod, yet this is not written about in any of the other three gospels (Luke 23:7-10).

Was he scourged before the final sentence or after the final sentence? Did Pilate and his soldiers put a robe of Jesus and mock him or was it Herod and his soldiers? Why does the Book of Luke not mention the scourging?

In Matthew we read that Jesus was scourged after the final sentence and before he had a robe placed upon him and a reed placed in his right hand before being mocked and spat upon by Pilate’s soldiers (Matthew 27:26-31).

In the book of Mark we read that Jesus was scourged after the final sentence and before he had a robe placed upon him and was mocked and spat upon by Pilate’s soldiers (Mark 15:15-20).

According to Luke Jesus was not even scourged or spat upon. It was in fact Herod’s soldiers who placed the robe upon Jesus and mocked him before sending him back to Pilate (Luke 23:11).

The gospel of John tells us that Jesus was scourged before the final sentence. Jesus even had a robe placed upon him and was mocked – but not spat upon – by Pilate’s soldiers before the final sentence (John 19:1-3, 16).

There are so many inconsistencies – and I have only discussed but a few – about Jesus’ alleged trial and punishment that it is impossible to factually state that any of these events took place.

Jesus brought good tidings of peace (Isaiah 52:7; Luke 4:14-15).

The first thing to notice about this alleged proof text is where it states that Jesus went. “And Jesus returned in the power of the Spirit into Galilee…” The problem is that the “messenger of good tidings that announces peace” is returning to Zion – that is Jerusalem. Jesus returned to the Galilee and not to Jerusalem.

The entire chapter’s prophecy has yet to be fulfilled.

Isaiah 52:1 – There are plenty of the uncircumcised and unclean which continue to enter Zion. So, this part of the prophecy remains unfulfilled.

Isaiah 52:2-3 – Not all of Zion is being held by the Children of Israel. This part of the prophecy remains unfulfilled.

Isaiah 52:4-6 – Zion is not free from those who oppressed God’s people. There is blaspheming of God’s name in Zion. Not all of His people know His Name and who He is. This part of the prophecy remains unfulfilled.

Isaiah 52:7-9 – The Messiah has yet to arrive. The Temple has not been rebuilt in Jerusalem. God has not returned to His dwelling place – the Temple. Jerusalem is not redeemed. The people of God are not comforted. This part of the prophecy remains unfulfilled.

Isaiah 52:10-12 – All the ends of the earth have not seen the salvation of God. There are no bearers of the vessels of the Lord – the vessels of the Temple. God’s children are not free from haste and fear. This part of the prophecy remains unfulfilled.

Isaiah 52:13-15 – The servant of God – that is, Israel – is not exalted and lifted up. The nations are not startled and have not shut their mouths against the children of Israel. The nations have not yet perceived God and all His might. This part of the prophecy remains unfulfilled.

Jesus himself stated that he was not coming in peace (Matthew 10:34).

Jesus was a servant who was exalted (Isaiah 52:13; Matthew 17:5; Philippians 2:5-8; Acts 1:8-11; Ephesians 1:19-22).

Isaiah 49:3: And He said to me, “You are My servant, Israel, about whom I will boast.”

It is very plainly spelled out that verse one is speaking about Israel and not a future Messiah.

The entire chapter’s prophecy has yet to be fulfilled.

Isaiah 52:1 – There are plenty of the uncircumcised and unclean which continue to enter Zion. So, this part of the prophecy remains unfulfilled.

Isaiah 52:2-3 – Not all of Zion is being held by the Children of Israel. This part of the prophecy remains unfulfilled.

Isaiah 52:4-6 – Zion is not free from those who oppressed God’s people. There is blaspheming of God’s name in Zion. Not all of His people know His Name and who He is. This part of the prophecy remains unfulfilled.

Isaiah 52:7-9 – The Messiah has yet to arrive. The Temple has not been rebuilt in Jerusalem. God has not returned to His dwelling place – the Temple. Jerusalem is not redeemed. The people of God are not comforted. This part of the prophecy remains unfulfilled.

Isaiah 52:10-12 – All the ends of the earth have not seen the salvation of God. There are no bearers of the vessels of the Lord – the vessels of the Temple. God’s children are not free from haste and fear. This part of the prophecy remains unfulfilled.

Isaiah 52:13-15 – The servant of God – that is, Israel – is not exalted and lifted up. The nations are not startled and have not shut their mouths against the children of Israel. The nations have not yet perceived God and all His might. This part of the prophecy remains unfulfilled.

Jesus was shockingly abused (Isaiah 52:14; Matthew 26:67-68; Luke 18:31-33).

Isaiah 49:3: And He said to me, “You are My servant, Israel, about whom I will boast.”

It is very plainly spelled out that verse one is speaking about Israel and not a future Messiah.

The servant will be exalted and lifted up (Isaiah 52:13-15). Israel – the servant is not exalted and lifted up. The nations continue to speak against Israel for they do not perceive God and all his might. Therefore, this part of the prophecy remains unfulfilled.

Who exactly mocked and ridiculed Jesus? Was it those under Pilate or those under Herod (Matthew 27:24-31; Luke 23:6-11)? We can even see in the story from Luke that Jesus was not spat upon or even whipped by Herod or Pilate.

The portion offered as a proof-text from Luke was inserted and copied from the Book of Mark (Mark 10:32-34). We see that Mark and Matthew both copied their sources for the alleged abuse from Mark – who copied the information from an extraneous source. The problem is that later in Mark there is absolutely no mention of the scourging that Jesus predicted (Mark 15:16-20).

Luke makes the statement that “…everything written by the prophets about the Son of Man will be fulfilled. He will be handed over to the Gentiles and he will be mocked and insulted and spat upon; and after they have scourged him they will kill him, but on the third day he will rise.”

The scourging is not even mentioned in Mark – the source for the story in Luke. In addition, Luke attributed the statement that “on the third day he will rise” to “the prophets” but there is no such prophecy.

Jesus’ message startled the nations (Isaiah 52:15; Romans 15:18-21).

Isaiah 49:3: And He said to me, “You are My servant, Israel, about whom I will boast.”

It is very plainly spelled out that verse one is speaking about Israel and not a future Messiah.

The servant will be exalted and lifted up (Isaiah 52:13-15). Israel – the servant is not exalted and lifted up. The nations continue to speak against Israel for they do not perceive God and all his might. Therefore, this part of the prophecy remains unfulfilled.

Paul deliberately misquotes the passage from Isaiah (Romans 15:21). The passage from Isaiah declares that the nations will be shaken by things they were never told and things that they never heard. There is no mention in Isaiah about the nations seeing or hearing of a messiah.

Jesus was not seen by all the Nations. This verse from Isaiah declares that the nations will be shaken due to things they see. Since all the nations did not see Jesus then he obviously did not fulfill this prophecy.

Jesus’ bloodshed atoned for everyone (Isaiah 52:15; Revelation 1:5).

Isaiah 49:3: And He said to me, “You are My servant, Israel, about whom I will boast.”

It is very plainly spelled out that verse one is speaking about Israel and not a future Messiah.

The followers of Jesus were never made priests and kings (Revelation 1:6). The early followers of Jesus – as well as the modern-day followers – were never made into a “kingdom [and] priests.” Therefore this “proof text” is false on its face. Of course there were kingdoms set up by the Church and there are priests of all sorts but that is not what John is speaking about in Revelation. Not to mention, when Revelation was written the early Christians were being persecuted and were most definitely not a “kingdom [and] priests.”

It is important to note that the majority of the Greek manuscripts as well as early versions of the text (λούσαντι ἡμᾶς) reads “washed us” and not “freed us” as is translated here. This fact is significant when it comes to using this as “proof” of Jesus’ bloodshed freeing us from our sins. If we are washed in his bloodshed that does not necessarily translate into a freeing of sins.

This passage in Isaiah refers to the nations being shaken by Israel and their relationship to God (Isaiah 49:23, Isaiah 60:10).

Bloodshed is not the only way to attain salvation (Isaiah 43:11, 25; Micah 6:6-8).

Jesus was rejected by the Jewish nation (Isaiah 53:1; John 12:37-38).

This verse is speaking about the servant who is Israel (Isaiah 49:3). It is very clear that throughout these so-called “Servant Songs” the servant is Israel and it is the Nations who are being spoken to – or are doing the speaking (Isaiah 49:1-4).

This particular prophecy is talking about how the Nations will show their surprise at how prosperous Israel – God’s servant – is considering how severely afflicted the servant was in the past.

If we look further into this chapter from Isaiah we see that this prophecy cannot possibly be about Jesus. As we can see from Isaiah 53:10 there are three proofs that Isaiah is not speaking about Jesus.

1. Jesus was allegedly a sin offering yet the servant is a guilt offering.

2. Jesus had no offspring yet the servant is promised offspring.

3. Jesus allegedly died in his early thirties but the servant is promised long life.

Jesus grew up in a poor family and he had the appearance of a man (Isaiah 53:2; Luke 2:7; Philippians 2:7-8).

This verse is speaking about the servant who is Israel (Isaiah 49:3). It is very clear that throughout these so-called “Servant Songs” the servant is Israel and it is the Nations who are being spoken to – or are doing the speaking (Isaiah 49:1-4).

It is possible that this verse from Isaiah can be translated as: “He had no form or beauty that we should look at him, and no appearance that we should desire him.” However, this in no way implies poverty. It can imply that the servant is not someone who attracts followers. But this is obviously not true of Jesus if one believes the Christian texts.

There is also absolutely no indication that the servant will “take on the appearance of a man.” There is only an indication that the servant’s personality and degradation does not lend the servant to exuding confidence and God’s chosenness.

If we look further into this chapter from Isaiah we see that this prophecy cannot possibly be about Jesus. As we can see from Isaiah 53:10 there are three proofs that Isaiah is not speaking about Jesus.

1. Jesus was allegedly a sin offering yet the servant is a guilt offering.

2. Jesus had no offspring yet the servant is promised offspring.

3. Jesus allegedly died in his early thirties but the servant is promised long life.

Jesus lived a sinless and non-violent life (Isaiah 53:4-6; I John 3:5; I Peter 2:22).

Jesus did indeed sin.

*Honoring the father and mother (Leviticus 19:3 versus Matthew 10:34-37

*Attitude toward Gentiles (Exodus 22:20 versus Matthew 15:22-27)

*Not adding to, subtracting from, or changing the Torah (Deuteronomy 13:1, 24:1 versus Matthew 19:9; Exodus 20:10 versus Matthew 12:1)

Jesus did indeed commit violent acts (Matthew 21:12; Mark 11:15-16; Luke 19:45; John 2:15).

Jesus died for our sins (Isaiah 53:11; Mark 10:45).

Man shall only be punished for his own sins (Ezekiel 18:20).

God does not require blood sacrifices and human sacrifices are absolutely against God’s Law (Ezekiel 33:11; Jeremiah 36:3; Hosea 14:3).