Leviticus Proofs

Jewish Apologetics >> Torah Proofs >> Leviticus Proofs

Jesus cleansed the leper, thus proving himself to be a priest (Leviticus 14:11; Luke 5:12-14).

The condition being discussed is tzara’at (צָרָעַת) which is not leprosy. This is easily seen from verse 34. Leprosy does not afflict houses. We see in Luke that Jesus healed a man of lepra (λέπρα) – leprosy. This is not the disease that is spoken about in the verse from Leviticus.

The cleansing is done after the tzara’ath has already healed (Leviticus 14:3). We see in Luke that Jesus healed the man. This is not part of what the kohen is charged with doing according to the law in Leviticus.

The initial cleansing does not include sacrifices. On the seventh day, if the person is healed of the tzara’at, the kohen performs the cleansing ritual which involves two birds, a cedar stick, a strip of crimson wool, and a hyssop. One of the birds is slaughtered over spring water in a bowl while the other bird and objects are dipped in the slaughtered bird’s blood. After which the person is sprinkled seven times with the bird and objects. The live bird is set free and the person must immerse his garments and himself in water and shave off all his hair. The person is now cleansed.

We see in Luke that Jesus commands the man to take sacrifices to the priest as commanded. Sacrifices are not initially taken to the kohen – only the birds and other objects I have mentioned. In addition, the sacrifices are brought only after the kohen determines if the person is healed and has been cleansed. The person does not bring the sacrifices as a “testimony” to the kohen that he is healed. So, we see that Jesus’ command in Luke is wrong. It is on the eighth day that the person will bring a sin offering, burnt offering, and meal offering to the kohen thus effecting atonement for the person who was just cleansed. After the sacrifices, the person is considered completely cleansed.

Jesus was the once-for-all sin offering (Leviticus 16:15-17; Hebrews 9:7-14).

Jesus did not fulfill any of the actual laws for the Yom Kippur sacrifice. A he-goat will be used as the sin offering for the Children of Israel. This is the offering that was brought on Yom Kippur from the time of the Mishkan (Leviticus 16:5). The other sin offering is for Aaron and his household only. This is the offering that was brought on Yom Kippur by the Kohen Gadol from the time of the Mishkan (Leviticus 16:6). The blood of the sin offering of the bull – that is the sin offering for Aaron and his family – was sprinkled on and around the Ark (Leviticus 16:14). Jesus was never a “sacrifice” for Aaron and his household. Jesus’ blood was not sprinkled on and around the Ark.

The blood of the sin offering of the he goat – that is the sin offering for the Children of Israel – was sprinkled on and around the Ark (Leviticus 16:15). Jesus was never a “sacrifice” for the Children of Israel. Jesus’ blood was not sprinkled on and around the Ark.

We see in Leviticus 16:16 that Aaron was to make atonement for those who

1. Defiled the sanctuary accidently by entering the sanctuary without knowing they were unclean

2. Defiled the sanctuary willfully by entering the sanctuary knowing they were unclean

3. Those who committed unintentional sins

None of these apply to the supposed sacrificial purpose of Jesus.

It was not the blood that cleansed the people. It was the teshuva, in other words – repentance. Those who bring sin sacrifice must also repent of their sins. Since this is true, the blood of Jesus has no effect upon people since he did not call for repentance.

Sacrifices were never the only way to repent and return to God. Blood is not a requirement for forgiveness (Psalm 40:7; II Samuel 12:13; Micah 6:6-8; Hosea 14:2-3) Jeremiah even warned against overreliance on the sacrificial system ((Jeremiah 7:3-7, 21-23).

If Jesus was the last sin sacrifice, why will the sacrifices be reinstituted when the third Temple will be built (Isaiah 56:7; Jeremiah 33:17-18; Zechariah 14:21; Zechariah 43:22-25)? Why did Paul and four other men bring sacrifices as prescribed for the Nazirite vow (Acts 21:17-26) which includes a sin offering (Numbers 6:13-15)?

Jesus was the once-for-all sin offering that was burnt outside the camp (Leviticus 16:27; Matthew 27:33; Hebrews 13:11-12).

Jesus did not fulfill any of the actual laws for the Yom Kippur sacrifice. A he-goat will be used as the sin offering for the Children of Israel. This is the offering that was brought on Yom Kippur from the time of the Mishkan (Leviticus 16:5).

The other sin offering is for Aaron and his household only. This is the offering that was brought on Yom Kippur by the Kohen Gadol from the time of the Mishkan (Leviticus 16:6). The blood of the sin offering of the bull – that is the sin offering for Aaron and his family – was sprinkled on and around the Ark (Leviticus 16:14). Jesus was never a “sacrifice” for Aaron and his household. Jesus’ blood was not sprinkled on and around the Ark.

The blood of the sin offering of the he-goat – that is the sin offering for the Children of Israel – was sprinkled on and around the Ark (Leviticus 16:15). Jesus was never a “sacrifice” for the Children of Israel. Jesus’ blood was not sprinkled on and around the Ark.

In Leviticus 16:25 we see that the fat was to be burnt on the altar within the Mishkan. Jesus was never burnt as a sacrifice (even only part of him).

There were multiple sacrifices that were slaughtered inside the camp. The multiple sacrifices (one for Aaron and his family and one for the Children of Israel) were slaughtered inside the camp (Leviticus 16:3). Jesus was not slaughtered inside the city.

Parts of the sin offerings (the blood and fat) were used in ceremonies within the camp (Leviticus 16:14-15, 25). The blood and fat of Jesus were never used in ceremonies within the city.

Jesus was the once-for-all sin offering whose blood made atonement for sin (Leviticus 17:11; Matthew 26:28; Mark 10:45; I John 3:14-18).

If we look at this verse in context we see that it is really referring to the idea that blood is the life source and this is why we are forbidden to offer sacrifices anywhere other than the Tabernacle (and later the Temples) and why we are forbidden to eat blood (Leviticus 17:3-4, 8-14). We see that this verse in context is not only referring to sin sacrifices. It is really only offering an explanation and command that the sacrifices must be offered in a specific way and only offered to God. This is not a statement about blood sacrifices being the only way to have a remission of sins. This command is about the sanctity of life. The blood is the life of all living creatures. This is a command against murder and the harming of humans and animals.

Sin sacrifices are to be brought by someone who unintentionally sins and the sins are made known to him. (Leviticus 4:27-28). Nowhere in the Tanakh does it say that blood is the only accepted form of atonement for sins. It was not the blood that cleansed the people. It was the teshuva – repentance. Those who bring sin sacrifices must also repent of their sins.

Repentance also atones for sins (II Samuel 12:13). Devotion to God also atones for sins (Micah 6:6-8). Prayer to God also atones for sins (I Kings 8:46-50). Charity also atones for sins (Daniel 4:24).

During the Messianic Age, sacrifices will be reinstituted (Jeremiah 33:17-18; Zechariah 14:21).