Torah

The Torah (the Books of Moses) (תורה) is made up of five books that were given to Moshe directly from G-d shortly after the Exodus from Mitzraim around 1230BCE. The Written Torah was handed down through the successive generations from the time of Moses.

Books of the Torah

  • Bereishit (Genesis) – written by Moshe
    Bereishit is the first book of the Tanakh and the first book of the Torah. The narrative speaks of the time from the creation of the world to the descent of the children of Israel into Egypt, and it contains some of the best-known biblical stories, including: Adam and Eve; Cain and Abel; Noah’s Ark; Tower of Babel; Biblical Patriarchs and, Story of Joseph. READ MORE…
  • Shemot (Exodus) – written by Moshe
    Shemot is the second book of the Tanakh and the second of five books of the Torah written by Moses. Sefer Shemot tells how Moses leads the Children of Israel out of Egypt, through the wilderness to Mount Sinai. At Mount Sinai God, through Moses, gives the Children of Israel their laws and enters into a covenant with them. This covenant includes giving them the land of Canaan as promised to Abraham. The book ends with the construction of the Tabernacle. READ MORE…
  • Vayikra (Leviticus) – written by Moshe
    Vayikra is the third book of the Tanakh and the third of five books of the Torah written by Moses. Sefer Vayikra contains laws and priestly rituals, but in a wider sense is about the working out of God’s covenant with the Children of Israel set out in Bereishit (Genesis) and Shemot (Exodus). READ MORE…
  • Bamidbar (Numbers) – written by Moshe
    Bamidbar is the fourth book of the Tanakh and the fourth book of the Torah. This book may be divided into three parts:

    1. The numbering of the people at Sinai, and preparations for resuming their march (1–10:10).
    2. An account of the journey from Sinai to Moab, the sending out of the spies and the report they brought back, and the murmurings (eight times) of the people at the hardships by the way (10:11–21:20).
    3. The transactions in the plain of Moab before crossing the Jordan River (21:21–36). READ MORE…
  • Devarim (Deuteronomy) – written by Moshe
    Devarim is the fifth book of the Tanakh and the fifth book of the Torah. A large part of the book consists of three speeches delivered by Moses reviewing the previous forty years of wandering in the wilderness, and the future entering into Eretz Yisrael. The central element of the book is a detailed law-code by which the Children of Israel are to live by while residing in Eretz Yisrael. Theologically the book constitutes the renewing of the covenant between God and the Children of Israel. READ MORE…